Diwali :The Festval of Lights,Date,How is Celebrate,Significance,Muhurat

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Diwali 2020: The Festival of Lights

diwali 2020 images


Diwali, Deepawali is the major festival of Hindus which is celebrated every year in autumn. Diwali is the oldest festival in the Hindu tradition, which has been celebrated with great pomp throughout India.
Although many festivals and festivals are celebrated in Hinduism, Deepawali is the biggest and important festival of Hindus.

  This festival of Deepawali is celebrated every year in the autumn. The weather is pleasant at this time. This festival is celebrated during the arrival of autumn. According to the Hindi months, the festival of Diwali is celebrated on the new moon day of Kartik month. The festival of Diwali is celebrated in the month of October or November according to the English calendar (Gregory calendar).

This festival of Deepawali is one of the major and most popular festivals of India. Deepawali is the
festival of lamps which is celebrated with great pomp as the victory of light over darkness. This festival is celebrated to commemorate the victory of Satya  (Lord Rama) over the untruth (Ravana). This festival of Deepawali has great social and spiritual significance.

This festival is also called Deepotsav i.e. festival of lamps. Apart from Hinduism, this festival is also
celebrated by people of Sikh, Buddhist and Jainism. It is celebrated as the salvation day of Mahavira by the people of Jainism. It is celebrated by the people of Sikhism as a prisoner leave day.

Why Diwali is celebrated: -


diwali celebrate

The festival of Deepawali is an important and spiritual festival of Hinduism, which is celebrated with great pomp throughout India. Although many festivals are celebrated in Hinduism, the festival of Deepawali has a special significance in itself. There is a spiritual and historical reason to celebrate the festival of Deepawali. According to the ancient Hindu scripture Ramayana, people celebrate Deepavali by cutting back the 14-year exile of Lord Rama, Goddess Sita and Lakshmana in the joy of returning home. This festival of Deepawali is celebrated in honour of the victory of religion over unrighteousness. On this day, Lord Rama killed the demon king Ravana and returned to Ayodhya after deducting 14 years of exile. In the joy of Lord Rama's return, the people of Ayodhya lit ghee lamps to welcome him. In the joy of the arrival of Lord Rama to Ayodhya, the people of the city welcomed him with joy, sweets and a variety of dishes were made. Different regions and religions have different beliefs to celebrate the festival of Deepawali. As such, the festival of Deepawali is celebrated in the joy of returning to Ayodhya after cutting the 14-year exile of Lord Rama.

But different scriptures of Hinduism and beliefs in celebrating the festival of Deepawali in different regions also have different. According to the ancient epic Mahabharata, this festival of Deepawali is
celebrated by the Pandavas in the joy of returning back to the Pandavas after 12 years of exile. On the festival of Deepawali, people also believe in Lakshmi Pujan. On this day people worship Lakshmi and pray for wealth. Lakshmi is called the Goddess of Wealth by the people of Hinduism. In some parts of India like Orissa, West Bengal, people of Hindu religion worship Kali.



Diwali in Jain, Budh and Sikh Religion:-


Apart from Hinduism, the festival of Deepawali is celebrated with great pomp in other religions as well. People of different religions celebrate this sacred festival of Deepawali with their religion's beliefs and customs. In Jainism, celebrating the festival of Deepawali has its own distinct belief. It is said in Jainism that 24th Tirthankara Mahavir Swami attained salvation on this day (on Diwali). It is said that on this day Gautam Gangadhar, the first disciple of Mahavir Swami, the 24th Tirthankara of Jainism, had attained enlightenment. Therefore, the worship of Deepavali of Jainism is completely different from other religions, because people of Jainism celebrate Deepavali as Maha Nirvana Day (salvation) of Mahavir Swami.


diwali celebration


For those who believe in Sikhism, the festival of Deepawali has a special significance according to their own tradition and beliefs. People of Sikh faiths celebrate this day as a captive day, because on Diwali itself, in 1619, the sixth Guru of the Sikhs, Hargovind Singh Ji was freed from the imprisonment of the Mughal ruler Jahangir and came to the Golden Temple in Amritsar. In 1577, the foundation stone of the Golden Temple was established on this day in Amritsar. For all these reasons, the festival of Deepawali is important for the people of Sikhism.

The festival of Deepawali is not special for people of Buddhism, as Deepawali is not a festival for most Buddhist people. People of Buddhism worship different deities and celebrate the festival of Diwali by worshipping Lakshmi, the goddess of wealth. Worshipping any religion in Buddhism has no restriction on worshipping the deities.



How is Diwali celebrated


The festival of Deepawali is celebrated in different regions according to their prevalent customs and
traditions. The festival of Deepawali is called the festival of lamps. People light a lamp on the festival of Deepawali. People celebrate the festival of Deepawali according to the method prevalent in their religion. Deepawali is an important festival of Hinduism. People of Hinduism celebrate it with full tradition and faith. The festival of Diwali has spiritual and historical significance, hence the festival of Deepawali is celebrated with great pomp. Its preparation starts 15-20 days before the festival of Deepawali. All people clean their own homes on the occasion of the festival of Deepawali. People shop before Diwali and bring new clothes for themselves.

On Diwali, people decorate their homes with candles and lights. On the day of Deepawali, people go to each other's house and embrace and wish each other well. A variety of dishes are made on the festival of Deepawali. Rangoli, feast and various types of lights are put on the floors for the decoration of Deepawali. People make fireworks with firecrackers. The festival of Deepawali is also called the festival of lights for his significance.

The festival of Deepawali is celebrated for 5 consecutive days. These five days of the festival of
Deepawali has its own significance. Every day of Deepawali has different beliefs and the way of
celebrating is also different.
Dhanteras, the first day of Deepawali festival also called Dhanteroyashtmi
  Second-day hell Chaturdashi, small Diwali
  Laxmi Pujan Deepawali on the third day
  Govardhan Pooja Annakoot Bali Parit falls on the fourth day
  Bhaiya Duj is the fifth day.


First day of  Deepawali: Dhanteras

 The festival of Deepawali begins on the day of Dhanteras. On the day of Dhanteras, many people buy new utensils. It is believed that buying goods on Dhanteras is auspicious. Although the homes are cleaned in advance to celebrate the festival of Deepawali, on the day of Dhanteras, people clean their homes and business sites. This day of Deepawali is a major day to buy new utensils, household items, firecrackers and anything new. On this day, filling small lamps with oil, place them in front of the idol of Lakshmi and Ganesha and worship for 5 consecutive days. On the day of Dhanteras, women and children decorate Rangoli, Rangoli made of rice flour and flowers decorate their house and office. On the day of Dhanteras, the great special Dhanvantari of Ayurvedic is worshipped. Dhanvantari is called the God of health and hygiene. On the day of Dhanteras, people clean their home office etc.


Chhoti Diwali (Narak Chaturdashi)

 Narak Chaturdashi is also known as Chhoti Diwali in some areas. The second day of the festival of Diwali is celebrated as Narak Chaturdashi i.e. Chhoti Diwali. The festival of Chhoti Diwali is celebrated 1 day before the second fortnight of the moon, ie Amavasya. Naraka Chaturdashi is celebrated to liberate the soul from suffering. On short Diwali, some Hindu people pray for the peace of soul of their ancestors. On the day of Chhoti Diwali, people do a cyclic circumambulation for the peace of soul of their fathers. Another important reason is to celebrate this festival of Narak Chaturdashi. The demon Narakasura is believed to have ended by Lord Krishna on this day and rescued the abducted princess from her bondage. Narak Chaturdashi or Chhoti Diwali is an important day for buying food items and dishes. On the day of the small Diwali, people have bought different types of sweets. In some areas, Chhoti Diwali is also known as Cooker Diwali. Cooker means dog. On this day people feed bread to black dogs. It is believed that feeding bread to a black dog is auspicious on a short Diwali.

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